Iroquoian circa 1500

This is our printing page for current “live” versions of cards for the Iroquoian peoples, circa 1500.  These cards are used in the Connect the Facts Card game.  They may also be used in other available Gaming strategies.

Notes:  The best way to print is to first let the whole page load all the images.  (Grab a coffee, because these images are large!  But it should take a minute or two.)  Then use Safari or Microsoft Explorer/Edge and print to your printer, testing with one page only at first.  They should print two cards per page at around 3 or 4 inches high. 

Print in colour or black and white to regular paper when laminating.
Print on harder stock paper when not laminating.
Cut out the card image and cut off the card front you are not using.
If possible do not cut the fold between the back and front you choose to use, so they don’t separate or get misplaced!

 

Iroquois: 100000 people

Iroquois: 100000 people 2

Iroquois: Clothing for the seasons

Iroquois: Gather hunt fish and farm

Iroquois: Gather hunt fish and farm 2

Iroquois: Trading between nations

Iroquois: Resources for sustaining life

Iroquois: Language family many dialects

Iroquois: Oral tradition- word is king

Iroquois: Legends through storytelling

Iroquois: A sedentary way of life

Iroquois: Longhouse and sedentary

Iroquois: Extended family in longhouse

Iroquois: Women as farmers, makers

Iroquois: Nations in a confederation

Iroquois: Importance of the clan

Iroquois: Donnacona a chief

Iroquois: Archaeology tells us they traded

Iroquois: Getting around in Iroquoia

Iroquois: Corn on menu

Iroquois: The three sisters

Iroquois: Crafted beautiful objects

Iroquois: Objects for every need

Iroquois: Shamans

Iroquois: A spirit is in everything

Iroquois: Lived in Great Lakes regions

Iroquois: Great Lakes flow into St. Lawrence

Iroquois: Fertile lands three sisters

Iroquois: Water forest and animals

Iroquois: Children part of mother clan

Iroquois: Men went to war

Iroquois: Men hunted and fished

Iroquois: Men cleared the fields

Iroquois: Women as gatherers and makers