Since fishing was such an important economic activity for the Mi’kmaq, issues related to the fishing rights of salmon and lobster were close to their heart and sometimes led to clashes with non-Aboriginals. In 1981, the government’s decision to limit catches of salmon caused anger among the Mi’kmaq. For the Mi’kmaq, salmon was a traditional source of food and income.

The Mi’kmaq from Restigouche eventually came to an agreement about salmon fishing with the Quebec government. They protected their rights to salmon fishing and protected the resource by limiting the duration fishing of the fishing season. In 1982, the Mi’kmaq from Maria joined non-Aboriginal neighboring villages to form the Salmon Management Company of Great Cascapedia. The Mi’kmaq also reduced their catch, and in exchange, they got the right to half the jobs created by this organization which organized fishing trips.

Author: Service national du Récit de l’univers social